Archive for March 2011

30 Mar, 2011 | Posted by: st







"A penny saved is a penny earned" Benjamin Franklin was famous for saying.

Mikael Karlsson is developing a "Savings Guide" for stock photographers. In the coming months, we're going to feature some articles from his bank of saving tips. This week the subject is "Internet "

The Internet


The Internet is a wealth of information about magazines, book publishers, journals, blogs, web sites etc. that might be interested in using your photographs.
You can use a free search engine service to find out who is looking for you and your photos at this moment.

In the search bar of a search engine like Google, type in the words:
Publishing
guidelines
book
magazine _________________ .

Where you see the “blank” above, fill it in with your particular specialty(s)in stock photography.

You’ll find on the first two pages (20 entries) of the search, potential markets you probably never heard of. You are now networking. Some of the entries will lead to other markets that also need your category of stock photos.

Some publishers may not feature "Photographer Guidelines" but they will feature "Writer's Guidelines." You'll find these iseful and applicable to photographers' guideliens.

Happy hunting!

Photojournalist Mikael Karlsson has 28 years' experience of working for magazines and newspapers in more than 30 countries. He moved to the
United States in 1998 from his native Sweden. He lives in Nebraska and is currently USA correspondent for 11 Swedish magazines and writes a
how to photograph
column for PhotoStockNOTES. To reach Mikael
via email
.



23 Mar, 2011 | Posted by: st







"A penny saved is a penny earned" Benjamin Franklin was famous for saying.

Mikael Karlsson is developing a "Savings Guide" for stock photographers. In the coming months, we're going to feature some articles from his bank of saving tips. This week the subject is "The Library and Bookstore"


Spend a day at the library and bookstore


Constantly building, renewing and adding to your mailing list is a great way to expand your business.

Since buying address lists is very expensive for the average stock photographer, use the wealth of information at the local library or local bookstrre. The good news is that you can easily build your own mailing list there for zero dollars.

Browse books and magazines that cover the topic that you specialize in. Write the titles and any contact information you can find. Very often email addresses are included in the masthead of the magazine or book.

At the bookstore, take your laptop along. Find the up-to-date titles of new books coming out that cover your specialization area. Check out how other photographers are producing images that photobuyers will accept.

Bookstores and publishers always keep ahead of the game and try to predict (market research) the next "buzz." Notice any new aisle markers for book stacks that weren't there the last time you visited. It's a sure bet that the book stores and publishers have anticipated "what will be the next trend."

Use your computer to search Google or your favorite Internet search engine to find contact information you couldn't locate previously. If you don't have access to a computer or the Internet, your library is very likely to offer free Internet access.

Librarians are usually very knowledgable in helping you find publications in your specialization area. Search for new contacts in the large size directories available at most libraries. Look through previous periodicals and publications to see what they have used in the past. This will assist you in tailoring your marketing exactly to the type and style of photographs individual photobuyers have a need for.

As with any marketing effort the more you know about your target audience and their photo needs, the more successful your marketing will be.


Photojournalist Mikael Karlsson has 28 years' experience of working for magazines and newspapers in more than 30 countries. He moved to the United States in 1998 from his native Sweden. He lives in Nebraska and is currently US correspondent for 11 Swedish magazines and writes a how to photograph column for PhotoStockNOTES. To reach Mikael via email .



16 Mar, 2011 | Posted by: st





"A penny saved is a penny earned" Benjamin Franklin was famous for saying.

Mikael Karlsson is developing a "Savings Guide" for stock photographers. In the coming months, we're going to feature some articles from his bank of saving tips. This week the subject is "E-mail marketing".



E-mail marketing

A good alternative to mailing postcards is to market through e-mail if your clients and photobuyers are open to it. It’s free. There are a number of services that will assist you in sending professional-looking e-mails with opt-out options and much more.
Constant Contact is one example and they offer a trial period free of charge so you can try it out and make sure it works for you and the folks you market to before you decide.
You certainly can rely on simply sending e-mails out from your own computer without subscribing to a service like that offered by Constant Contact and similar providers. Keep the e-mails simple and to the point.
Your subject line should be to the point and not so obscure that the recipient might pass you by. Avoid "poison words" such as "free", Hurry!, or CAPS. Also, avoid humor or tempting curiosity unless you are a master at it.
Avoid animations at all cost. Use photographs but understand file sizes and how long it takes the recipients to download and open your e-mail messages. Consider sending your emails to photobuyers in both text and HTML format. Most buyers these day can accept the HTML format.
Remember to add a link to your blog and web site where visitors can sign up for your e-mail promotions and updates.

Photojournalist Mikael Karlsson has 28 years' experience of working for magazines and newspapers in more than 30 countries. He moved to the United States in 1998 from his native Sweden. He lives in Nebraska and is currently US correspondent for 11 Swedish magazines and writes a how to photograph column for PhotoStockNOTES. To reach Mikael via email .

09 Mar, 2011 | Posted by: psnotes





"A penny saved is a penny earned" Benjamin Franklin was famous for saying.

Mikael Karlsson is developing a "Savings Guide" for stock photographers. In the coming months, we're going to feature some articles from his bank of saving tips. This week the subject is "Starting a Blog".

Start A Blog


Marketing is about being visible. Having a blog that you link to from your website, and visa versa, can be a great marketing tool. Promote it to your clients as yet another way for them to keep up with what you're doing; recent additions of photos to your files, upcoming photo-shoots etc.

Blog services such as Blogger, TypePad, WordPress and others are typically free. Easy to set up and easy to get going. Be sure to post your best entries on your social networking accounts, Twitter, FaceBook, etc.

It takes a little initial effort to get your blog up and running. The trick with blogs is to keep updating and update often. The other trick is to keep it interesting and relevant. Keep to business-related posts. Use key words in your posts that the search engines will pick up. This will result in a higher rank in Google for your blog and other search engine searches. This will result in free advertising for you.

Take advantage of the ease of adding photos to your posts. Use alt tags with your photos that will serve as additional keywords for you.

Once you start getting visitors you'll get feedback as to what people are reading on your blog. Use the free Google Analytics software to evaluate the productivity of your blog. This will give you insight of what works for your specialized audience.

If you want to post things of a personal nature, please consider getting a separate blog for that. Some folks can find a great balance between personal and business related posts. For me personally, and my day-to-day situation, I can't think of a single thing in my personal life that would even slightly interest the photobuyers I regularly work with.

Photojournalist Mikael Karlsson has 28 years' experience of working for magazines and newspapers in more than 30 countries. He moved to the United States in 1998 from his native Sweden. He lives in Nebraska and is currently US correspondent for 11 Swedish magazines and writes a how to photograph column for PhotoStockNOTES. To reach Mikael via email .

02 Mar, 2011 | Posted by: psnotes





"A penny saved is a penny earned" Benjamin Franklin was famous for saying.

Mikael Karlsson is developing a "Savings Guide" for stock photographers. In the coming months, we're going to feature some articles from his bank of saving tips. This week the subject is "Selecting an Agency ".

Selecting an Agency

First and foremost, you want to find an agency that matches your photographic specialty. If you photograph agriculture and rural America, it would be rather pointless to sign with an agency specializing in urban photography.
Do your research and find the most suitable agency for your photos. A good research tactic: Pretend you are a photobuyer seeking a certain category of photos; type in your search phrase, and then “stock agency.”
Ask agencies for references in the form of photographers currently with the agency. Contact these photographers and ask them if they’re happy with the agency, if payments are on time, if sales are good, etc. Avoid any agency that isn’t willing to provide names and contact information of photographers currently with the agency.
Visit an agency’s website. Make sure it is easy to navigate, that finding specific photos is easy and fast, that the image search is returning relevant results. Using Google or any other major search engine, do a few image searches where you enter the keywords for a specific photo, the + sign and the name of an agency. Ponder how easy, or difficult, it is to find the photos that the agency represents.
Does the agency offer a way for photobuyers to purchase and download high-resolution images directly from their website? If not, why not? Look at other agencies in the same field and see if they offer direct downloads. Carefully compare different agencies before signing on the dotted line.
Agencies can be exclusive or non-exclusive. Exclusive means that the agency will not allow you to send the same photos to them plus to a different agency. Signing with a non-exclusive agency permits you – most often – to sign up with different other agencies, to get the widest possible distribution of your photos.
If you have something very unique to offer, signing an exclusive deal with a popular and respected agency can be a tremendous benefit to you. But for most editorial stock photographers, non-exclusive contracts are both the norm and most efficient.

Photojournalist Mikael Karlsson has 28 years' experience of working for magazines and newspapers in more than 30 countries. He moved to the United States in 1998 from his native Sweden. He lives in Nebraska and is currently US correspondent for 11 Swedish magazines and writes a how to photograph column for PhotoStockNOTES. To reach Mikael via email .